What Does Elvis Presley Mean?

Elvis Presely playing guitarMost Americans and music lovers worldwide acknowledge Elvis Presley as “The King” of rock and roll. But some people have no idea who Elvis Presley is or what it means to be “The King” to millions of loyal fans.

This is what I learned from Cindy, the foreign exchange student from China that I hung out with for a few weeks.

I was taking a class on multi-cultural competency as part of the process towards my master’s degree in counseling. Our instructor, Vince Noble asked for volunteers to escort foreign exchange students and ease their transition into the USA. He may have even offered extra credit, I can’t remember. But I volunteered and was paired up with Cindy from China.

One day, Cindy and I went an art show at Cal State Long Beach. There were many paintings and several rooms filled with original art pieces created by students. We came upon a portrait of Elvis Presley. I admired the creativity of the piece. Cindy pointed at it and asked, “who is that?”

I was stunned. It was as if my life was flashing before me. I could not imagine how to describe who Elvis was. He is so many things to so many people and I couldn’t imagine what the world, or at least my world, would be like without him.

I managed to mumble out some answer about how Elvis was a rock legend and I hummed a few bars of Blue Suede Shoes and Jailhouse Rock to see if it would ring a bell.

Nothing.

I was speechless.

I had been slapped aside the head once again and reminded that just because I have an experience or a social construct built up around a certain object or person, doesn’t mean everyone else does. Have you ever found yourself in a situation like this, assuming the person you’re talking to knows something when really they don’t; assuming that everyone knows all the same things you do?

Story is Editable

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Fight Riff by EULA on DJ GAL-VaniZed Jukebox

This week’s GALVaniZed Jukebox song is Fight Riff by EULA. Singer Elyse exudes an artistic flair with punk rock edge. It’s a fun song with a strong beat and great to have on my iPod and listen to while I’m out for a walk. See the YouTube video here.

I like DIY feel of the video, reminiscent of the Clash and other artists from London who used the desert or an industrial wasteland as their set.
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An iPod allows you to fit 1,000’s of songs in your pocket; whereas a Jukebox stays in one place and your selections are limited. What would you do if you only had to choose only 52 songs to put on your iPod? What would the list include?

Jukebox Mary

Embers by Just Jack on DJ GAL-VanIZed Jukebox

This video takes you through a time travel of historic world events while repeating the verse “we are all embers of the same fire.” Another way of saying, we are all one and what one person does impacts all people.

Lyrics for Embers by Just Jack

The facts and the figures,
They overwhelm and stifle,
everything that you thought you Knew

The facts and the figures,
They overwhelm and stifle,
from the very first breath you drew

The facts and the figures,
They overwhelm and stifle,
and the petty decisions that you think make a difference.

The above and following verses are layered in loops throughout the song like a mosaic until the song ends

So tiny that they blow away like dust

Through all the devilish things we do

(I can’t help my stupid hope)

We are all embers, from the same fire

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An iPod allows you to fit 1,000’s of songs in your pocket; whereas a Jukebox stays in one place and your selections are limited. What would you do if you only got to choose 52 songs to put on your iPod? What would the list include?

Jukebox Mary

Warrior Woman Workout Playlist

Sometimes it’s hard to get motivated for your workout. Especially if you feel bad about your body or you’re in boring surroundings. I have a cure for you: The Warrior Woman Workout Playlist.

I’m warning you, this music is extremely high-energy and you will probably notice a difference in your body right away as you listen. Rather than drag your body unwillingly and lethargically through your 30 minute workout, why not glide like a gazelle or command your space like a warrior (or warrior princess).

This playlist will help set the tone for just that type of workout. I was on the treadmill at 3.0-5.0 miles for about 42 minutes with these tunes and I had a rockin’ good time. The majority of the time I was jogging, I only used the fast walk for warm up and cool down. All links go to iTunes.

Propellerheads Decksanddrumsandrockandroll I started off with On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (feat. Propellerheads) – Shaken and Stirred – The David Arnold James Bond Project This really set the tone for feelin’ a little James Bond meets Samantha Stevens. I was ready to raise the roof after this one. The song is 9:20 so it’s almost ten minutes of total starpower. Here are the songs that followed. I was in the zone!

Demons by Fatboy Slim

In Britain – Punk and Disorderly (Deluxe Edition)

Bodhisattva Vow by Beastie Boys

You’ll Never Change Me by Chron Gen

Drop That Thing by Groove Armada


Teenage Kicks by The Undertones


Annalisa by Public Image Ltd.

Cool down song:
Believe it or not, Playpen by Social Distortion. This band is kinda “slow/fast” I imagined one of the slow mosh pits I used to see develop at their live shows.

As a side note, many of the samples that iTunes chooses for these songs is the set-up leading to the intensely fast part, don’t let that fool you.

Listening to Devo Blockhead Demo While Cruising PCH in Huntington Beach

I was driving down PCH on Sunday, listening to some vintage tunes and remembering the “good old days” when all I needed to be happy was music and a drive in the car. In fact, I actually relived the feeling and felt appreciation for the fact that I live in Southern California. I decided to capture my summer drive down PCH on video for a few reasons.

One is: at this time there is no Devo Blockhead video except a few live videos with poor quality and one with just a picture of the album cover. The other is, I figured, “hey, I’m not the only teenager from the ’80s who cruised up and down PCH in the summer listening to things like Devo, maybe someone else will want to remember the feeling with me.”

PCH has changed so much since 1983, in fact, everything has. I have found that I can be happy if I accept and appreciate the changes or I can be miserable and uptight thinking that things should be different. On this Sunday, I just decided to go with the flow and make the best of my ride. If you need a little mental get-away, this video might help. By the way, post a comment if you’re one of those people who is soothed by getting in the car, listening to music and driving along the coast. Beep Beep.

Start a Master Mind Group.comWhen you think about it, every musical act you know of is using the Master Mind principle whether they realize it or not. They are joining together as a team with a combined vision. You can use the same principle and make some truly rockin’ things happen in your life.

Do you have a creative project you want to complete? Do you want to find a purpose for your life?

If so, I invite you to come over to my brand new page called Start a Master Mind Group.com. I’m offering 4 freebies to get you started so you can get a sense of what the Master Mind is all about.

There’s nothing cool about holding back.

Consequences of a Music-Less Life

I’m still curious and confused about the seeming lack of availability and interest in new, emerging, underground music. Maybe I’m a rare case. Maybe music means more to me than most but here’s my story of how a lack of music almost killed me.

In the 80’s I was a teen and a punk rocker. I was basically on my own after the age of 16 so I went to every gig I could, some times going to live shows 2-3 times in one week. Little did I know, this constant barrage of punk and alternative music was shaping my opinions, passions and politics on a deep level. Punk rock actually gave me wings. I admired the dedication and bravery of the musicians I went to see. I realized that I wasn’t the only one who noticed that some things are not right in the world.

I don’t have to tell you, no one wanted to hear what the punkers had to say in the 80’s. Most of the shows I went to had less than 100 people in attendance. When things got too big or too crazy, the cops were always there to break it up and take people off to jail. In some cases the riot squad greeted you as you entered the concert hall, just to let you know who’s in charge. Now, here we are, 25-30 years later seeing the teens of today listening to the music of the 80’s as if its something new and revolutionary.

May I interject here that the punk artists kids are listening to today aren’t just entertainers, some aren’t even technically musicians. Many punkers had no idea how to play their instruments when they first started. Many of them created hand-made fliers and had them photocopied free of charge on someone else’s photocopy machine. Most punks didn’t have contracts or agents. It was sheer grit, determination and persistence that kept the bands that you know about today alive. There are many, many other punk bands, some just as good or better than the ones you know about. The main difference is that some gave up and some didn’t. Punk legends like Mike Ness of Social Distortion exist solely due to determination.

Heres my beef: if the kids of today are listening to the music of 20 years ago, where are they getting the lesson of sheer grit, determination and persistence? Who is going to carry the torch and speak about today’s issues, most of which are the same as the issues of the 80’s, only worse. Why are the youth of today listening to anti-Reagan songs and not anti-Bush songs?

But I digress. I still haven’t explained how lack of music almost killed me. You see, when I was about 18 it was clear that my drug addiction was serious and I needed to do something about it. By the age of 21, I had been in several recovery programs and was beginning a process of wanting to change my life. For me, that meant I had to stay away from the old people and the old places. Gradually I began to slip away from my punk past and tried to be more “socially acceptable.”

The compelling need to “fit in” accelerated drastically when I entered college and eventually University. I found myself completely forgetting all about punk rock and gradually went to fewer and fewer live shows and even stopped listening to most of my records and tapes. I was proud of myself for a while, maybe too proud. I was reaching my goals and moving up in the world. I got a degree, then another degree, then another. In the process, I completely disconnected with my punk past.

I tried to fit in, get the jobs and connections I wanted. I was not connected with punk in anyway. I never had the opportunity to talk to anyone about seeing GBH at the Olympic Auditorium two times in one week or seeing the Ramones every year at the Paladium. I couldn’t listen to punk rock on the job and frankly, I found punk rock to be distracting to me and my goals.

Eventually music even began to annoy me. I was mad at the neighbors when they played it too loud. I saw myself turning into the cranky old drag that I encountered in most adults I met. I began running on auto-pilot. I listened to rap and hip-hop, maybe just because it was there and everyone else was listening. I was becoming noticeably depressed. I was training to be a therapist and sitting in meetings talking about “clients” who have “problems”. All the clients and problems were familiar to me, a part of my past.

I believed that each client I saw had potential to overcome whatever they wanted. I believed they could be whoever they wanted to be. Yet none of the ‘professionals’ agreed. I was shunned, not taken seriously and basically told “you’re just an intern, what do you know?”

On the one hand I was offended by the callous and careless way professionals talked about the people we were supposed to be helping but often I kept my mouth shut. When I did open my mouth, there was always a consequence. I was dismissed from more than one position for having an opinion. I tried to keep my mouth shut. I became more and more depressed. I chastised myself and thought to myself “why cant you just be like everyone else? Why can’t you just fit in and shut up?”

So, there I was, training to be a therapist and for the first time in my life, I found it completely necessary to take anti-depressants. I literally felt like I was going crazy and that was especially disturbing in light of the fact that I was supposed to be helping people!

Ironically, it was when I was “cleansing” my negative past that I found my soul mate and reconnected with music in a new and positive way. My husband, former owner of Zed Records in Long Beach was in the store when I brought in a stack of vinyl to sell. In the process of sorting, scanning and observing my records for their suitable re-sale potential, I sparked up a conversation with the man who would become my husband within about a year. He liked hockey, I liked hockey. He liked punk, I liked punk. We enjoyed each others company. But it would be almost 10 years before I began to realize the significance of our match and the importance of music in drawing us together.

In 1998 I experienced small reminders and nudges of who I was and who I could be but I wrote most of them off as the “idealistic, unrealistic, drug-induced fantasies” of the past. I would hear the nudging call to action in songs by Black Eyed Peas and A Tribe Called Quest but I mostly hid my love of hip-hop because fears like “what will people think, I should grow out of this, I’m just some old person trying to be cool.” Hip Hop and Punk were like guilty indulgences I hid from the ‘professional’ people in my life.

Once I got an iPod, things really began to change. Once I was able to easily carry the soundtrack of my life in my purse, able to listen to the Buzzcocks followed by Snoop Dogg and chased by Social Distortion anytime, anywhere; I began to transform. My dreams re-awakened. Lyrics of power, being yourself and letting go of concern for what others think lifted my soul.

I began to tell people, “I used to be a punk rocker.” I described my spiky blue hair and my shaved head. Some people laughed, some people said “cool”, others were entirely speechless, still others said “no way” as they stood there with their eyes bugged out.

The familiar lyrics and sounds of the underground began to stir something within my soul. I began to remember who I really was. I stopped caring about what everyone thought. I started to think about what I want for my life rather than what society wants for my life. I began to realize the traps I build around myself and how the mainstream society reinforced the validity and ‘rightness’ of those traps. Sometimes I was pissed off. Other times I was shocked. Sometimes I was sad but mostly I was determined. I was determined to revive the 16-year-old punker in me. I was determined to take her out of the closet and say look world, here I am so $*& you!

I could go on and on but mainly I have a deep, nagging fear and this is why I’m writing this long post. If the youth of today have no role models to show them how to be independent, to start their own businesses, to live free of corporate oppression, what on earth does the future hold in store for us? Will it be a rehash and reinforcement of the same old, same old? Will George Orwell’s 1984 be a reality?

Remember, most of the popular anti-depressants, anti-anxiety medications on the market didn’t even exist in the 1980’s and now they are being passed out like candy to many people as a cure-all for the ‘problem of depression’. Rates of depression increase in society and pharmecuetical companies become more powerful. What if the depression is from oppression? If so, all the pills in the world aren’t gonna help.

Listening to music that’s 10, 20 or 30 years old makes about as much sense as reading newspaper articles from 30 years ago and claiming that you are informed and educated. The time is now, with the advent of instant information for all of us to step out of our boxes a bit and look at what’s new while continuing to enjoy what’s old. I think we need to listen to the message under the message.

Punk is more than just a bunch of rebellious, belligerent youth with a lack of classical music training. Punk is a movement and a statement about deciding to be who YOU are not what society determines you should be. Right this moment new music is being created by new people. Some of them will be huge one day, others will fade away but if you’re sitting at home listening to the same stuff your parents listened to, you’re missing out on the real-time experience of history in the making.

(Me and the Black Eyed Peas in 1998. They played at a record store inside Universal Studio Walk, about 30 people were there to see them….if that. Truthfully, most people were there to see Kobe, a well-known soccer player, BEP just happened to be the “opening act.” If you were paying attention to alternative radio (KCRW.com/Chocolate City) you could have been there. I will tell you this: NOBODY except me asked for their autograph and to take a picture with them. I have the Behind the Front album signed by the entire band.)

I’m so grateful that I had all the experiences I had in life and Im grateful for the opportunity to experience first-hand how plain, ordinary (and sometimes downright untalented) people say “I don’t care” and go for it anyway. And guess what, it ends up that it doesn’t matter if someone is good or not. As long as you are clear about who you are and don’t give up, you will make it. That’s the message under the message. Do you hear it?

(This article was originally written in 2006)

Dread Zeppelin – New Release Due January 8, 2009

Dread Zeppelin lead man Jah Paul Jo sent a message to his friends on My Space. It said a few things that I thought some of you would like to know.

**Dread Zeppelin is celebrating their 20th Anniversary in 2009

**The day of the celebration just so happens to coincide with “The Kings” birthday, January 8

**There’s gonna be a new DVD and several 20th Anniversary CDs and swag releases in 2009. You can pre-order the first DVD at a special discount price on their new website, dreadzeppelin.tv.

**They are looking for stories from people who saw them between 1989 and 1995.

Well, if you’ve got a story, like I do, you might want to go to their MySpace page and add them as a friend.

My story is, I saw them at an N.A. (Narcotics Anonymous) dance in Stanton CA, in 1989. They were so much fun. The singer dresses and acts just like Elvis Presley while gyrating his hips and singing Led Zeppelin classics like Whole Lotta Love and Stairway to Heaven. In my memory, they were one of the first bands to ever do the whole “lounge music meets rock and roll” thing and they do it very well.

I will never forget the show itself. The singer was draped in several white scarves (as in torn strips of sheet) around his neck. Every once in a while, he’d whip one off from around his neck and swing it around in circles. The women were supposed to swoon. I did. And he threw the scarf into the audience. I held it like a sacred cloth and even took it home and saved it for a little while.

This video probably best represents what I experienced. If you have a Dread Zeppelin story, leave a comment here or go over to their MySpace page and add them as a friend.