Graduating to the New Semester

It’s the beginning of a new semester. A fresh start after a wonderfully relaxing summer. Last semester ended so beautifully that I wanted to carry the energy all through summer and into the fall. When momentum is rapid, and there are lots of people giving you positive feedback, it’s easy to stay enthusiastic. But when people mumble, complain and drag their feet or denigrade your ideas it can be demotivating.

Sometimes I am the one doing the mumbling, complaining and feet dragging. Because I forget. I forget the first day I walked into the financial aid office. I forget how I worked 2-3 jobs at a time just to pay rent as a student. I forget how bad my feet ached when I was a waitress. And worst of all, I forget that the whole reason for being a college professor is to make a difference in people’s lives. Sometimes, I lose sight of the big picture.

Luckily, I have good friends and Galvanized Group partners who won’t let me wallow in my misery. It was my friend Ahman who sent me the above video. A call to teachers from Elijah Miles, Bank of America Student Leader at Teach For America in Baltimore. Seeing this video seemed like a confirmation and a kick in the rear to follow through on some of the momentum and ideas that have generated over the past few years. Last semester really solidified it. College classes are a place where major life transformations can take place and I can help facilitate that or I can block it.

Based on what I’ve experienced and the information I’ve gathered so far, I decided to combine two of my passions in a way that would create a winning scenario for my students and the community at large. Music and teaching. Not just teaching facts and figures but teaching strategies for life. I teach in the Human Services department. Mental illness, trauma and addiction are major health factors and the people who need services most are the least likely to get them. Sometimes the treatment available is entirely inadequate for the patient.

A growing body of research is finding that music heals trauma for some people better than pharmaceuticals. This information might be helpful because music is easier to access than health care in the United States.

So, how do a sum all of this up? I guess what I’m trying to say is, each semester is a new opportunity to graduate. An opportunity to move from one level of knowledge to another and an opportunity to apply the knowledge to life.

The way I see it, I graduated again last June. During my full-bodied learning semester I met face to face with people, with music and with mental illness. I am in the swarm of transformation along with my students and I hope to keep it that way. And as the semester begins picking up steam, each week, I also begin anew, delivering a modified style of educating in the classroom. It’s all within the rules and regulations of the college and in fact, involves other college professionals. It is within the rules and an example of when following the rules can be awesome.

Listening = Building Associations

The Master Mind principle is based on the idea that we all share one mind and as more people share a similar belief, the cultural consciousness shifts. One of the places you can hear the direct relationship of influence is music.

Most music today is inspired by music from the past. Not everyone who listens to music knows this but people who produce it usually do and they often have a reason for being influenced by a certain artist.

Stevie Wonder has been an incredible source of influence for many hip-hop and R & B artists. Today when I was at the gym the song Rocket Love (1980) came on.

Starting at about 1:21 in the song and throughout the song is a lyric “Cold Cold World”. This same lyric and sound is a song by Genius GZA released in 1996. Today when I heard Rocket Love, I also heard Cold World in my mind which made me think of how and maybe why I discovered this song to begin with.

Do people unconsciously make their current music choices based on influences from the past? Are musicians consciously or unconsciously shaping our culture with their message? Does listening to old music keep you stuck?

As a person who’s been heavily influenced by music I try to make my selections consciously and as a DJ I also have a conscious intention to build unity and a family vibe.

DJ Gal VanIZed EPIC Summer Night 2013

And yes, a group of people in a room listening to the same music, laughing and dancing at the same time is probably one of the most powerful Master Mind groups there can be. Whatever you say or play today, do it consciously, pay attention and play wisely. The words you share will undoubtedly impact the future.

Rare Reggae and La Jolla Sunset Video Sets Good Vibe

Relax and unwind while watching the waves and the sunset at La Jolla California. Rare reggae and dub records from Jamaica via Zed Records blended with a La Jolla Sunset backdrop. Guest appearance by Mr. Seagull.

Follow IamGalvanized’s board Music on Pinterest.

Music is Shown to Benefit and Exercise the Brain

You may have heard your friends and family stress the importance of having a song in your heart. It turns out, music benefits your brain as well. Many people listen to music without even thinking about how their brain reacts. But doctors say it exercises it in ways that nothing else can.

Music therapy is being used increasingly for patients with dementia or traumatic brain injury. It’s already used for a variety of roles in people’s lives, and because of what parts of the brain it exercises, musical training is shown to increase motor and reasoning skills. Other studies have shown that a person’s choice in music is a great determination of that person’s personality. But a doctor explained how listening or performing music is a unique mental exercise.

“We find that when someone is asked to sing a song, for example, after a brain injury, how many different parts of the brain get utilized,” said CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta. “First, you’ve got to remember the words to that song, and then you’ve got to carry those words across from one side of the brain to the other, to allow someone to actually begin to say those words. Then you’ve got to carry a tune. That requires messages going across the middle of the brain as well, and then sometimes you can stand up and do some moves with the music and that can reestablish rhythm.”

Follow IamGalvanized’s board Music on Pinterest.